ChatGPT and what it means for our future

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ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by Smith1776 » Sun Jan 08, 2023 3:49 pm

AI is becoming scarily capable.

Here are some examples of how frighteningly intelligent the ChatGPT AI system is when given prompts:

"Write a chess playing program using JavaScript."

"Describe an asset allocation for an investment portfolio utilizing a risk parity investment strategy. "

"Write an HR plan for a textile company with 500 people in the city of Toronto."

"Write a scene between Stewie and Brian for an episode of Family Guy."

This will shake up every industry in the entire economy and threatens to replace a massive amount of people employed in every sector. This will also likely increase the wealth gap as the benefits disproportionately accrue to those who control the technology. The magnitude of this type of advancement is bigger than going from the desktop computer to having smartphones and Google.

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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by dualstow » Sun Jan 08, 2023 4:29 pm

“Do my homework”
Let 2023 be the year of LASAGNE
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by Smith1776 » Sun Jan 08, 2023 4:35 pm

dualstow wrote:
Sun Jan 08, 2023 4:29 pm
“Do my homework”
Let's imagine it's grade 10 English class and your assignment is to write a poem in the style of Shakespeare about a topic you're interested in.


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I currently experiencing a fair degree of concern about the future regarding my labour value and employability relative to a machine. :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o
My only regret... is that I have... Boneitis.
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by vnatale » Sun Jan 08, 2023 4:57 pm

Smith1776 wrote:
Sun Jan 08, 2023 4:35 pm

dualstow wrote:
Sun Jan 08, 2023 4:29 pm

“Do my homework”


Let's imagine it's grade 10 English class and your assignment is to write a poem in the style of Shakespeare about a topic you're interested in.



Screen Shot 2023-01-08 at 3.33.30 PM.png




I currently experiencing a fair degree of concern about the future regarding my labour value and employability relative to a machine. :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o


In 2005 Thomas Friedman came out with this book: The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century Hardcover – April 5, 2005

In it he predicted that tax preparers in the United States would soon all be out of a job because anyone in the world could prepare one and at a far lower cost than using someone in the United States to do so. At the time reading it ... it seemed plausible. But in the intervening 17 years it's not even come close to happening.

There is something to be said about the personal touch and doing things in person.
Above provided by: Vinny, who always says: "I only regret that I have but one lap to give to my cats." AND "I'm a more-is-more person."
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by Mountaineer » Sun Jan 08, 2023 5:02 pm

vnatale wrote:
Sun Jan 08, 2023 4:57 pm
Smith1776 wrote:
Sun Jan 08, 2023 4:35 pm
dualstow wrote:
Sun Jan 08, 2023 4:29 pm
“Do my homework”
Let's imagine it's grade 10 English class and your assignment is to write a poem in the style of Shakespeare about a topic you're interested in.



Screen Shot 2023-01-08 at 3.33.30 PM.png




I currently experiencing a fair degree of concern about the future regarding my labour value and employability relative to a machine. :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o
In 2005 Thomas Friedman came out with this book: The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century Hardcover – April 5, 2005

In it he predicted that tax preparers in the United States would soon all be out of a job because anyone in the world could prepare one and at a far lower cost than using someone in the United States to do so. At the time reading it ... it seemed plausible. But in the intervening 17 years it's not even come close to happening.

There is something to be said about the personal touch and doing things in person.
The tax preparers just punch your data into TurboTax and ….. voila, you believe a person has done your tax and then happily fork over 3X what you could have paid by just using TurboTax yourself. 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣
Flannery O’Connor - “The truth does not change according to our ability to stomach it.”
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by dualstow » Sun Jan 08, 2023 5:13 pm

EDIT:
chaGPT wrote: The diameter of a silver Britannia coin depends on the specific version of the coin that you are looking at. Britannia coins are British silver bullion coins that have been produced by the Royal Mint since 1987. The coins are available in various sizes and denominations, and the diameter of each coin can vary depending on the size of the coin and the specific design that is being used.

Here are the dimensions of some of the most common silver Britannia coins:

1 oz silver Britannia coin: 38.61 mm in diameter
1/2 oz silver Britannia coin: 27 mm in diameter
1/4 oz silver Britannia coin: 22 mm in diameter
1/10 oz silver Britannia coin: 16.5 mm in diameter
These dimensions may vary slightly depending on the specific year and design of the coin, as the Royal Mint has released several different versions of the silver Britannia coin over the years. In general, however, the diameter of a silver Britannia coin is typically between 16.5 mm and 38.61 mm.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
We have also chatted about Cantonese characters that don’t exist in Mandarin, substances that are almost as hard as diamond, whether Hebrew slaves helped build the pyramids, and about sabre toothed tigers.

It doesn’t know today’s date as it is cut off from the world.
Let 2023 be the year of LASAGNE
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by vnatale » Sun Jan 08, 2023 5:14 pm

Mountaineer wrote:
Sun Jan 08, 2023 5:02 pm

vnatale wrote:
Sun Jan 08, 2023 4:57 pm

Smith1776 wrote:
Sun Jan 08, 2023 4:35 pm

dualstow wrote:
Sun Jan 08, 2023 4:29 pm

“Do my homework”


Let's imagine it's grade 10 English class and your assignment is to write a poem in the style of Shakespeare about a topic you're interested in.



Screen Shot 2023-01-08 at 3.33.30 PM.png




I currently experiencing a fair degree of concern about the future regarding my labour value and employability relative to a machine. :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o


In 2005 Thomas Friedman came out with this book: The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century Hardcover – April 5, 2005

In it he predicted that tax preparers in the United States would soon all be out of a job because anyone in the world could prepare one and at a far lower cost than using someone in the United States to do so. At the time reading it ... it seemed plausible. But in the intervening 17 years it's not even come close to happening.

There is something to be said about the personal touch and doing things in person.


The tax preparers just punch your data into TurboTax and ….. voila, you believe a person has done your tax and then happily fork over 3X what you could have paid by just using TurboTax yourself. 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣


Not so simple! All tax preparers do use some form of tax software but depending upon the complexity of your tax return a tax return preparer can save you net money over what you pay the tax return preparer.

Some people should do their own tax returns while other people should not.
Above provided by: Vinny, who always says: "I only regret that I have but one lap to give to my cats." AND "I'm a more-is-more person."
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by Smith1776 » Sun Jan 08, 2023 5:38 pm

dualstow wrote:
Sun Jan 08, 2023 5:13 pm
The diameter of a silver Britannia coin depends on the specific version of the coin that you are looking at. Britannia coins are British silver bullion coins that have been produced by the Royal Mint since 1987. The coins are available in various sizes and denominations, and the diameter of each coin can vary depending on the size of the coin and the specific design that is being used.

Here are the dimensions of some of the most common silver Britannia coins:

1 oz silver Britannia coin: 38.61 mm in diameter
1/2 oz silver Britannia coin: 27 mm in diameter
1/4 oz silver Britannia coin: 22 mm in diameter
1/10 oz silver Britannia coin: 16.5 mm in diameter
These dimensions may vary slightly depending on the specific year and design of the coin, as the Royal Mint has released several different versions of the silver Britannia coin over the years. In general, however, the diameter of a silver Britannia coin is typically between 16.5 mm and 38.61 mm.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
We have also chatted about Cantonese characters that don’t exist in Mandarin, substances that are almost as hard as diamond, whether Hebrew slaves helped build the pyramids, and about sabre toothed tigers.

It doesn’t know today’s date as it is cut off from the world.
The text about silver Britannia coins is from chatGPT?
My only regret... is that I have... Boneitis.
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by dualstow » Sun Jan 08, 2023 6:06 pm

yep
Let 2023 be the year of LASAGNE
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by flyingpylon » Sun Jan 08, 2023 6:49 pm

Uncle Karl had some thoughts on ChatGPT this morning:

The Modern NPC
Actual intelligence -- of any level -- is demonstrated only by "out of scope" results to the question posed. If whatever returns the results does not exceed the scope of factual knowledge it starts with them it is not thinking. It is nothing more than a pattern-matching device -- perhaps a very fast one (and computers are very fast) but it is displaying nothing more than the ability to do pattern matching at high speed.
It cannot synthesize, even when presented information it did not formerly have. But whoever programmed it has taught it, when challenged to synthesize beyond its ability to deliberately obfuscate which is a form of lying rather than either integrating that new information, deferring a response and stating it does not know and must take time to study the matter in more detail or honestly admit that out-of-scope synthesis is beyond its ability.
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by vnatale » Sun Jan 08, 2023 6:50 pm

flyingpylon wrote:
Sun Jan 08, 2023 6:49 pm

Uncle Karl had some thoughts on ChatGPT this morning:

The Modern NPC

Actual intelligence -- of any level -- is demonstrated only by "out of scope" results to the question posed. If whatever returns the results does not exceed the scope of factual knowledge it starts with them it is not thinking. It is nothing more than a pattern-matching device -- perhaps a very fast one (and computers are very fast) but it is displaying nothing more than the ability to do pattern matching at high speed.


It cannot synthesize, even when presented information it did not formerly have. But whoever programmed it has taught it, when challenged to synthesize beyond its ability to deliberately obfuscate which is a form of lying rather than either integrating that new information, deferring a response and stating it does not know and must take time to study the matter in more detail or honestly admit that out-of-scope synthesis is beyond its ability.



Seems right to me.
Above provided by: Vinny, who always says: "I only regret that I have but one lap to give to my cats." AND "I'm a more-is-more person."
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by Mark Leavy » Sun Jan 08, 2023 8:05 pm

The Davinci - 003 engine is even better.

Not free, but cheap. And scary good.

It is like finding a new tool. Something fearful, yet something to be embraced. A lever where none was before.


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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by Smith1776 » Sun Jan 08, 2023 9:26 pm

I posted about this on my social media and have had literally no reactions to it. This is despite my previous posts about everyday things getting lots of interactions.

I really think that people have yet to grasp how this technology is going to impact their lives.
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by Mark Leavy » Sun Jan 08, 2023 9:36 pm

Smith1776 wrote:
Sun Jan 08, 2023 9:26 pm
I really think that people have yet to grasp how this technology is going to impact their lives.
True
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by dualstow » Mon Jan 09, 2023 5:21 am

Soon enough.
I had forgot to mention, chatGPT — can I call it George? — wrote some programs in BASIC for me last night. Today, there is high demand so it’s pausing a lot.
It did get something very wrong. I asked George if David Duchovny was in anything before X-Files. It gave me the wrong characters from Twin Peaks as well as some wrong characters from X-Files.

It also got some Cantonese wrong (and you don’t have to know the language to tell) because she went, “for example, it would be written ‘茶’, not ‘茶’.”

Davinci sounds amazing.
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by vnatale » Mon Jan 09, 2023 8:05 am

Smith1776 wrote:
Sun Jan 08, 2023 9:26 pm

I posted about this on my social media and have had literally no reactions to it. This is despite my previous posts about everyday things getting lots of interactions.

I really think that people have yet to grasp how this technology is going to impact their lives.


You missed that I shared your Facebook post!
Above provided by: Vinny, who always says: "I only regret that I have but one lap to give to my cats." AND "I'm a more-is-more person."
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by dualstow » Mon Jan 09, 2023 8:49 am

We’re not really keeping up with Ray Kurzweil’s predictions, but making progress.
https://www.kurzweilai.net/futurism-the ... redictions
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by Tortoise » Mon Jan 09, 2023 1:20 pm

One of the best Black Mirror episodes ("Be Right Back", S2E1) explored this concept in the context of AI imitating a dead loved one by training on their digital footprint. It was rather creepy. Hard to believe that episode aired 10 years ago...
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by SilentMajority » Mon Jan 09, 2023 1:54 pm

Mark Leavy wrote:
Sun Jan 08, 2023 9:36 pm
Smith1776 wrote:
Sun Jan 08, 2023 9:26 pm
I really think that people have yet to grasp how this technology is going to impact their lives.
True
With AI availability, they won't have to think about it at all, they can just ask the AI how it will impact their lives. Then they can ask the AI how they can best benefit from the AI.
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by dualstow » Mon Jan 09, 2023 2:12 pm

Tortoise wrote:
Mon Jan 09, 2023 1:20 pm
One of the best Black Mirror episodes ("Be Right Back", S2E1) explored this concept in the context of AI imitating a dead loved one by training on their digital footprint. It was rather creepy. Hard to believe that episode aired 10 years ago...
My favorite episode of one of my favorite shows.
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by Smith1776 » Mon Jan 09, 2023 2:30 pm

Tortoise wrote:
Mon Jan 09, 2023 1:20 pm
One of the best Black Mirror episodes ("Be Right Back", S2E1) explored this concept in the context of AI imitating a dead loved one by training on their digital footprint. It was rather creepy. Hard to believe that episode aired 10 years ago...
Interestingly that is the storyline of one of my favourite video games too: Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker.

The protagonist discovers that the villain of the game has created an AI that mimics his dead mentor -- who happens to be the greatest military mind who has ever lived.

Great game and great concept.

More relevant to the thread: what really excites/scares me is the threshold when AI becomes smart enough to improve itself in a self-reinforcing and recursive way. That's when the real intelligence explosion will happen IMHO.
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by Mark Leavy » Mon Jan 09, 2023 2:42 pm

Smith1776 wrote:
Mon Jan 09, 2023 2:30 pm
More relevant to the thread: what really excites/scares me is the threshold when AI becomes smart enough to improve itself in a self-reinforcing and recursive way. That's when the real intelligence explosion will happen IMHO.
AlphaZero (from 5 years ago) is self taught.
AlphaZero was trained solely via self-play using 5,000 first-generation TPUs to generate the games and 64 second-generation TPUs to train the neural networks, all in parallel, with no access to opening books or endgame tables. After four hours of training, DeepMind estimated AlphaZero was playing chess at a higher Elo rating than Stockfish 8; after nine hours of training, the algorithm defeated Stockfish 8 in a time-controlled 100-game tournament (28 wins, 0 losses, and 72 draws).[1][2][3] The trained algorithm played on a single machine with four TPUs.

DeepMind's paper on AlphaZero was published in the journal Science on 7 December 2018.[4] However, the AlphaZero program itself has not been made available to the public.[5] In 2019 DeepMind published a new paper detailing MuZero, a new algorithm able to generalise AlphaZero's work, playing both Atari and board games without knowledge of the rules or representations of the game.[6]
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by boglerdude » Mon Jan 09, 2023 10:52 pm

AI wont do anything until it can walk up stairs and open doors. ie combine with robotics. Then, things could get messy
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by Mark Leavy » Mon Jan 09, 2023 11:01 pm

boglerdude wrote:
Mon Jan 09, 2023 10:52 pm
AI wont do anything until it can walk up stairs and open doors. ie combine with robotics. Then, things could get messy
What do you think a Tesla is?
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Re: ChatGPT and what it means for our future

Post by Smith1776 » Mon Jan 09, 2023 11:09 pm

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