The Permanent Supplement Regime

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Xan
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by Xan » Wed Aug 14, 2019 9:27 am

Cortopassi wrote:
Wed Aug 14, 2019 8:41 am
sophie wrote:
Wed Aug 14, 2019 7:43 am
In honor of this I plan to get some pork shoulder and lard, and make sausages this weekend!
:)
What time should we come over??
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by Kriegsspiel » Wed Aug 14, 2019 11:55 am

sophie wrote:
Wed Aug 14, 2019 7:43 am
If you look at the most recent Dietary Guidelines document (2015), there is a subtle shift to demonizing saturated fats and simple sugars. There is no longer a maximum recommended intake of fats, only saturated fats (10% of calories). But, the document promotes grains (complex carbohydrates), lean meats, defatted dairy (no fat or 1% milk), and vegetable oils.
You're saying that like it's a bad thing? Lean meats and low fat dairy (if you can process lactose, obviously) are great! Vegetable oils like coconut and olive seem ok, I don't use them though. Even grains aren't evil. It's tough to get fat eating oatmeal.
In honor of this I plan to get some pork shoulder and lard, and make sausages this weekend!
Mmmmmmmmm. I have a pork shoulder in the freezer that I'm gonna make this week. Sound the feasting horn!
There are several thousand nearly complete viral genomes integrated into the human genome, most now inert or missing a crucial gene. These account for 1.3% of the entire genome. That may not sound like much, but 'proper' genes account for only 3%. If you think being descended from apes is bad for your self-esteem, then get used to the idea that you are also descended from viruses.
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by Kriegsspiel » Wed Aug 14, 2019 12:03 pm

Before I get at that pork though, I'm going to make some beef and corn soup with some of the corn I grew in my backyard. Even corn is tough to overeat in it's unprocessed form. It's pretty similar to oatmeal, with slightly more carbs and calories.
There are several thousand nearly complete viral genomes integrated into the human genome, most now inert or missing a crucial gene. These account for 1.3% of the entire genome. That may not sound like much, but 'proper' genes account for only 3%. If you think being descended from apes is bad for your self-esteem, then get used to the idea that you are also descended from viruses.
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by sophie » Thu Aug 15, 2019 8:31 am

They specifically excluded tropical oils from "vegetable oils".

It is about demonizing. A message about "moderation" and advice to limit sugar and processed foods would have been more useful, but I guess politically unpalatable. I'm surprised that the saturated fat message didn't get more protest, but I guess the promoting of lean meats got them past that. And while you may not get fat on grains, some people do. Even whole grains are still too much for some (me, for example).

Nothing wrong with lean meats, it's just that non-lean meats are good too. Not to mention that you can't get lean meats separately from the non-lean cuts, so what's supposed to happen to those?? Similarly, what happens to the fat skimmed off milk?

C'mon over anytime! Homemade sausage turns out to be super simple, yummy, and about 1/3 the price of pre-made stuff (that doesn't taste like cardboard).
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by Kriegsspiel » Thu Aug 15, 2019 9:26 am

sophie wrote:
Thu Aug 15, 2019 8:31 am
They specifically excluded tropical oils from "vegetable oils".
Oh ok.
It is about demonizing. A message about "moderation" and advice to limit sugar and processed foods would have been more useful, but I guess politically unpalatable. I'm surprised that the saturated fat message didn't get more protest, but I guess the promoting of lean meats got them past that. And while you may not get fat on grains, some people do. Even whole grains are still too much for some (me, for example).
It's funny they keep putting out their recommendations. Everybody knows people are gonna keep pounding down pizza and Oreos.
Nothing wrong with lean meats, it's just that non-lean meats are good too.
Yes, quite true.
Not to mention that you can't get lean meats separately from the non-lean cuts, so what's supposed to happen to those??
The people who want them will buy them? Hopefully cheaper, since people might not want them! I was listening to a podcast with a butcher, and he talked about how back in the day a particular cut of beef (can't remember which) was practically given away since nobody wanted it. Then it got popular and expensive. I guess this happens regularly. The meat industry is so efficient.

Similarly, what happens to the fat skimmed off milk?
Doesn't it get sold as heavy cream? EDIT and butter?
C'mon over anytime!
How nice 8)
There are several thousand nearly complete viral genomes integrated into the human genome, most now inert or missing a crucial gene. These account for 1.3% of the entire genome. That may not sound like much, but 'proper' genes account for only 3%. If you think being descended from apes is bad for your self-esteem, then get used to the idea that you are also descended from viruses.
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by Maddy » Thu Aug 15, 2019 10:52 am

sophie wrote:
Thu Aug 15, 2019 8:31 am
[W]hat happens to the fat skimmed off milk?
Sophie, now that you've tackled indoor farming, you really have to try making your own dairy products. I get my milk straight from the cow, but even store-bought raw or unhomogenized milk will work. It's so quick and easy, and from one gallon of whole milk you get a whole array of milk products for the week.

I generally buy milk by the gallon, and I immediately use about half of it for yogurt. Simply scald on the stove, cool to "baby bottle" temperature, pour into a quart mason jar, whisk in a dollop of culture (any fresh, live yogurt), and tuck away in a warm place for 8-12 hours. (I use a shelf on the wood cookstove in the winter, but I have successfully used a crock pot sans lid, and the top of a water heater.) That's Product No. 1.

I let the remaining half-gallon of milk sit in the refir for a half a day so that the cream separates to the top. I then ladle off the cream--two thirds into a quart mason jar (for butter) and a third into a pint mason jar (for sour cream). I commence vigorously shaking the larger, cream-filled mason jar for 5-10 minutes, past the "whipped cream" stage, and past the point where a discernible ball of butter has become noticeable. When there is a big, well-formed lump of butter sloshing around in a watery medium, I decant off the buttermilk (Product No. 2)--to later be used in whatever baking project I've got going. I take the lump of butter, knead salt into it, and form it into bars (Product No. 3).

I then take the pint jar of cream and set it in a warm place overnight. The shelf on a wood stove works great, but really any warm place will work. In the morning, you have a very nice batch of sour cream (Product No. 4).

All that takes only about 20 minutes. It's kind of a kick to get so many different things from one gallon of milk.
Homemade sausage turns out to be super simple, yummy, and about 1/3 the price of pre-made stuff (that doesn't taste like cardboard).
Please tell us how!
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by stuper1 » Thu Aug 15, 2019 1:27 pm

Wow, Maddy, that is awesome. You are a super hero! I felt like I was reading a chapter from Little House on the Prairie, and I mean that in the best way possible.

I was buying raw milk for a while, and seriously, it is outstanding, not just taste wise, but in how it made me feel. And this is from a guy who is somewhat lactose intolerant in regard to pasteurized milk. Right now, I'm trying dairy free to see if that helps me feel better and lose a few pounds, but if I do go back to dairy, I need to remember to make the effort to get the raw milk. Fortunately, we do have a local dairy that sells raw milk, despite the state regulators constantly giving them grief. The stuff isn't cheap. It's like two or three times the price of pasteurized milk, but totally worth it. If I do go back, maybe I'll be inspired by your post to make all those great products that you listed.

Yes, Sophie, please tell us how to make the sausage.

Raw milk and sausage, now those are the types of "supplements" that I can support.
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by pugchief » Thu Aug 15, 2019 1:31 pm

Sophie,

RE: oils & fats.......What is considered bad/good? And is the answer based on published research in, say, NEJM or similar? EV Olive oil is considered good by virtually all sources. But what about:

Butter?
Lard?
Coconut oil?
Palm Oil?
Canola Oil?
Corn Oil?
Soybean ('vegetable') oil?
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by Cortopassi » Thu Aug 15, 2019 3:39 pm

pugchief wrote:
Thu Aug 15, 2019 1:31 pm
Sophie,

RE: oils & fats.......What is considered bad/good? And is the answer based on published research in, say, NEJM or similar? EV Olive oil is considered good by virtually all sources. But what about:

Butter?
Lard?
Coconut oil?
Palm Oil?
Canola Oil?
Corn Oil?
Soybean ('vegetable') oil?
Butter, Lard, coconut, palm: good.

Rest bad.

But, can I elaborate on that greatly? No. Something about un-natural processing to make canola/corn/soybean oil and high Omega 6 concentrations in them.

------A link to why canola is not good:

https://heartmdinstitute.com/diet-nutri ... anola-oil/
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by sophie » Fri Aug 16, 2019 7:44 am

Maddy that is an awesome system!! Your post is pasted into my recipe book.

Sausage is dead simple!!!! You can make it with ground pork from the grocery, but then it comes out hard (but still delicious). To do it properly you need a meat grinder. I got a KitchenAid mixer attachment. Get pork shoulder or butt, which is usually a cheap cut, and some type of pork fat. Back fat is supposed to be best, but I haven't put in the legwork needed to find it. Lard does fine plus I use saved bacon fat. You want sausage to be somewhere between 10-20% fat by weight. Put the meat & fat through the grinder (helps if both are slightly frozen), then add salt and spice mix, mix well (use your hands, or I let my KitchenAid do the work). I don't bother stuffing into casings, I just roll into balls. I freeze these in a pan until hard, then store in a freezer bag. I might try the casings one day and see if that's worth the trouble, but I'm quite happy cooking sausage in patty or meatball form.

Check out this website for spice mixes: http://www.sausagemania.com/recipes.html. Warning, to my taste they use too much salt. My favorite mix, per pound of sausage mix, is: 1 tsp salt, 1/2 tsp black pepper, 1/4 tsp crushed red pepper flakes, 1 crushed or minced garlic clove, 1/2 tsp sage, and 1/8 tsp nutmeg.

Re health impact of fats - I agree with Cortopassi. The question isn't whether there's data to say a particular fat is good, it's that there's no strong data to support the stance that a particular type of fat is bad. The studies are mainly observational/correlative, which is worthless. Consider the history of hormone replacement therapy for primary prevention of heart disease: first there were reams of correlative studies that "proved" that HRT reduced heart disease risk by as much as 50%, which would blow statins and just about any other modifiable risk factor out of the water. So lots of women were put on HRT for this reason alone. Then WHI came along with a prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial. This study was stopped early when it became clear that HRT actually INCREASED heart disease risk. And so it goes for pretty much any intervention aimed at primary prevention. Apart from controlling type 2 diabetes, NOTHING, including aspirin or cholesterol lowering agents, has managed to show an overall positive benefit when rigorously tested. Different story for secondary prevention, but even there the benefit is minimal (something like 1% chance that an individual will benefit from a treatment).
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by Maddy » Fri Aug 16, 2019 8:53 am

Sophie-- Perfect! I've been wanting to try both sausage and jerky for some time now. This is great!

Re making butter: I forgot to mention that it's important to let the milk come to room temperature before shaking the jar. If you don't you may end up never getting past the whipped cream stage--which ain't all that bad, I suppose. If you take care to do that one thing, making butter is pretty much foolproof.
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Re: The Permanent Supplement Regime

Post by Cortopassi » Fri Aug 16, 2019 9:17 am

Just another bit of evidence of the dietary changes that started happening in the early 70s, I just watched Woodstock on American Experience (highly recommend it). Half a million people there, and tons of archival footage of the crowds, workers, bands, cops, etc.

Again, just like my Apollo observation, none were fat. It was even more shocking because there were SO many people, you'd expect to see some overweight. And this is where a LOT of the guys (and some of the girls) were topless walking around. Rail thin.

I always romanticize the late 60s in my head, but when they put it all in perspective, Vietnam, worry about the draft, MLK, Kennedy, it must have been a stressful time to be a late teenager/early 20s in 1969.

I though this was great. There was one kid who put down all these things as to what was wrong with him on his draft physical!

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