The Permanent Tooth and Gum Care Regime

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pugchief
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Re: The Permanent Tooth and Gum Care Regime

Post by pugchief » Sun Nov 17, 2019 11:12 am

vnatale wrote:
Sun Nov 17, 2019 10:46 am
pugchief wrote:
Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:33 am
vnatale wrote:
Sat Nov 16, 2019 9:40 pm

I don't think I have to tell YOU this....but I can assure you that Americans will NEVER put dentists out of business! The only way it will happen is if there are some radical advances in either medical or technology that require Americans to exert no effort on their parts!

Vinny
Americans will not put us out of business, but that won't be necessary bc we are working hard to put ourselves out of business. There will probably eventually be a 'cure' for tooth decay and gum disease (not in my career, but maybe my son's), and the schools are working diligently to crank out way more graduates than are necessary for the need in urban areas without requiring service in underserved areas. And don't even get me started on how insurance companies and idiotic government regulations are ruining the profitability of what little business remains.
What percentage of your patients have insurance?

Vinny
Around 95% have either an HMO, PPO or some kind of discount plan. Less than 5% pay pay full price. So for all practical purposes, I don't decide what I charge, the insurance companies do. Of course, they have no clue what my overhead is, particularly the real estates taxes on my office building. My costs keep going up, but the fees have been essentially stagnant for a decade. If I choose not to participate, I lose 90% of my patients.
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vnatale
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Re: The Permanent Tooth and Gum Care Regime

Post by vnatale » Sun Nov 17, 2019 11:41 am

pugchief wrote:
Sun Nov 17, 2019 11:12 am
vnatale wrote:
Sun Nov 17, 2019 10:46 am
pugchief wrote:
Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:33 am
vnatale wrote:
Sat Nov 16, 2019 9:40 pm

I don't think I have to tell YOU this....but I can assure you that Americans will NEVER put dentists out of business! The only way it will happen is if there are some radical advances in either medical or technology that require Americans to exert no effort on their parts!

Vinny
Americans will not put us out of business, but that won't be necessary bc we are working hard to put ourselves out of business. There will probably eventually be a 'cure' for tooth decay and gum disease (not in my career, but maybe my son's), and the schools are working diligently to crank out way more graduates than are necessary for the need in urban areas without requiring service in underserved areas. And don't even get me started on how insurance companies and idiotic government regulations are ruining the profitability of what little business remains.
What percentage of your patients have insurance?

Vinny
Around 95% have either an HMO, PPO or some kind of discount plan. Less than 5% pay pay full price. So for all practical purposes, I don't decide what I charge, the insurance companies do. Of course, they have no clue what my overhead is, particularly the real estates taxes on my office building. My costs keep going up, but the fees have been essentially stagnant for a decade. If I choose not to participate, I lose 90% of my patients.
I am fairly certain that my dentist only accepts one or two forms of insurance (Blue Cross / Blue Shield being one of them). So, it seems most of his patients are full payers like myself?

I've been on Medicare since April 2016 but have yet to chose the dental option. It's that time of year to review it and decide if the financial savings from having it will exceed the cost of the premiums.

My basic annual dental costs are three cleanings which include a dentist exam which I think are about $130 total each. And, now, upcoming is a crown (?) or something similar which will cost about $1,200 or $1,300? I think for something like that, though, you have to have a certain level coverage plus have been the plan for a certain length of time? In other words if I join the plan in January 2020 I don't think I'd have coverage for it in January 2020. Maybe in January 2021?

In any event, I've always believed in investing money in my teeth and not going cheap in that area.

Vinny
"I only regret that I have but one lap to give to my cats."
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Re: The Permanent Tooth and Gum Care Regime

Post by pugchief » Sun Nov 17, 2019 12:16 pm

The difference is that you live in a small, ruralish town where there is less dentist competition, so providers can just refuse to participate in most PPOs. I practice in a suburb of Chicago where the competition is fierce, so basically everyone who wants to actually work participates.
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vnatale
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Re: The Permanent Tooth and Gum Care Regime

Post by vnatale » Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:18 pm

pugchief wrote:
Sun Nov 17, 2019 12:16 pm
The difference is that you live in a small, ruralish town where there is less dentist competition, so providers can just refuse to participate in most PPOs. I practice in a suburb of Chicago where the competition is fierce, so basically everyone who wants to actually work participates.
Actually, I live 45 minutes away from my dentist. At some point I will privately send to you what I am paying and the demographics of the town in which he has his practice. Less than a mile from his office is an expensive college, one of the Seven Sisters - the female equivalent of the once predominantly male Ivy League.

And, this is one of the rare cases where those in near the city are paying LESS than those in the rural?

There is one dental practice about 5 or so miles from my house. And, another four in the next town over, where I work. But I've chosen to remain with my dentist who is 45 minutes / nearly 40 miles away. It's a semi-major event when I go for those cleanings. I budget for 3 hours from when I leave my house until when I get home.

Vinny
"I only regret that I have but one lap to give to my cats."
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